Business & Employment Prospects as an Aesthetic Practitioner in 2020

2020 has been quite the year so far. Alongside the tragedies the world has witnessed, the devastating impact of a global pandemic, and the abrupt interruption to life as we know it - many of you have been left wondering about your business and employment prospects as an aesthetic practitioner, and how to make money in aesthetics. As the next season approaches, we take a look at what you could expect for the tail end of this eventful year.   Is there a market? The aesthetics market has taken a hit as a result of COVID-19, much like every other industry. But with the dermal filler market estimated to reach a value of 4bn USD by the end of 2021, it will take more than a year of downtime to dismantle it, and there are new consumer trends emerging. Many patients are itching to get back to regular treatments and many more new patients are in the process of seeking out a practitioner. If you're wondering how to make money in aesthetics, rest assured the market will not be your biggest hurdle.   Adapt to survive In nature, a species has to adapt to survive - especially in the face of adversity. In the wake of recent times, your aesthetics practice is no different. If you are concerned about how to make money in aesthetics, act promptly to bolster patient retention, and entice new faces through the door. Now more than ever, you must firmly don your business hat alongside your medic’s hat. It’s time to level up and ensure the people who are having treatments are coming to you. Make sure your business is confidently ‘COVID Secure’ and has all the appropriate protocols in place to ensure safe practice.   Housekeeping In order to remain competitive in the industry during even the toughest of times (and 2020 certainly qualifies!) it is imperative that you know the ins and outs of your operations and have a firm understanding of your costs and expenses. Check you’re accessing the best deals and rates for materials, supplies, and other overheads. Do a thorough reconciliation and ‘plug the leaks’ that could be costing more than you realise (and more than you can afford) as we ease our way back to some semblance of business normality. Spending money on a slick marketing campaign is undermined if you’re paying over the odds for your business utilities - something that can be fixed quickly and easily once it’s given the attention it deserves.   Diversify Patients want more than ever from their aesthetics practitioner. To capitalise on this demand for a wide breadth of treatments under one, reliable roof - attend further training to enhance your clinical offering whilst also refreshing your skills and confidence. Consider diversifying into medical-grade skincare alongside your non-surgical injectables to broaden your opportunity for revenue, and address the growing consumer demand in this area.   Responsibly social Your social following and existing patients have the answers to your strategy woes. Use Instagram stories to ask questions about their aesthetics related concerns. Jump on a live stream or reels to deliver a Q & A session. Get creative! You will gain valuable insight into the perspective of your target audience, enabling you to provide value-centric, relevant information, and market appropriate offers accordingly. Your patients are astute and have their absolute pick when it comes to fulfilling their social appetite for content. Make sure your offering is authentic and gives them a chance to connect with you, and what you and your practice stand for.   Join a team If you are yet to launch your own practice you may be wondering how to make money in aesthetics and feel understandably overwhelmed at the prospect in light of recent events. If you would feel more secure earning a reliable aesthetician salary, consider seeking employment in an already established clinic. You can gain confidence and access invaluable support as you build up your experience in injecting and could consider branching out at a later, more stable time.   As ever - network 2020 is going to be a blip in the records for most businesses. As everyone works hard to find their feet and relaunch their practices, it is now more crucial than ever to have dependable business connections and strong community relationships. Partake in workshops, cross-promote fellow aestheticians, and attend conferences. There are valuable education and networking opportunities happening both virtually and in person, and more events planned for early 2021. Check out the below, just a selection of events offering an invaluable learning experience and the opportunity to maximise your networking potential: IAPCAM Symposium on managing complications Aesthetics Business Conference hosted by Hamilton Fraser Cosmetic Insurance AUCC - a free charity event bringing together a wealth of industry experts to provide a comprehensive educational experience to the aesthetics community. FACE Facial Aesthetic Conference and Exhibition Aesthetic Medicine Live   Keep the faith Most people, your patients included, just want to see some sort of normality resumed. We are all working towards business as usual, whilst making mindful choices to support and protect each other as we navigate to the finish line of this tempestuous year. Keep the faith, set a goal with an end of year deadline, and go for it. Your success as an aesthetician in 2020 can only be as big as you dream, plan, and work for.
Read More

Filler Training Course - What To Expect

If you’ve recently made the decision to undertake your first filler training course, kudos to you for embarking on a journey into the exciting and fast-paced world of aesthetics! It’s natural to have a few questions about what might be in store, so here we have laid out what to expect.   Online learning Many reputable aesthetics courses provide a selection of online learning materials in advance of the course date. This helps to contextualise the practical training, providing a base understanding across numerous relevant topics. Often, these materials will continue to be accessible to delegates for reference beyond training.   Theory lectures As the cornerstone of informed practitioners, comprehensive theoretical learning will likely comprise a good proportion of your filler training course. Covering a breadth of topics, most lectures will discuss anatomy and physiology of the skin and face, injecting styles and techniques in relation to the treatment area and desired outcome, and patient demographic and lifestyle variables. All reputable courses will cover topics such as conducting a consultation, informed consent, potential complications and how to manage them, and practical considerations such as product acquisition, insurance, and how to build your business.   Practical training Practical training is essential to any aesthetics course, helping to cement theoretical learning and giving delegates the opportunity to try out the techniques and skills that they have learnt. For delegates, practical training acts as the bridge between learning in the classroom and undertaking their own clients, post-course. This improves confidence and allows for any gaps in understanding to be recognised and addressed. Many courses offer delegates injecting practice on mannequin heads, but a good academy will arrange live models for delegates to inject.   Industry insights If you’ve done your research, your chosen academy will offer training hosted by experienced aesthetics trainers, who are already successful in the industry and ideally Key Opinon Leaders (KOLs) for a reputable company. This should not only instil confidence that you’re in safe hands but also provides you with exposure to industry insights. Often, aesthetics trainers teach courses alongside their own aesthetics clinics or whilst fulfilling a related role within the NHS, such as plastic surgery. They’ve started from the same position, so it’s the perfect time to ask questions.   Networking opportunities The industry is still on its way to becoming sufficiently regulated so in the meantime, beware of any academy without training entry criteria. If you choose your training provider wisely, you should find yourself in a room amongst your professional peers and seniors - rendering your first filler training course a perfect networking opportunity for your journey into aesthetics.   Ongoing support and mentoring Once you have completed your training, received your certificate, and set up your insurance, you’re ready to go! Now what?! A reputable academy will provide ongoing support and mentorship, helping soothe new venture jitters and giving delegates the added confidence of knowing they have an experienced team standing behind them - with a wealth of knowledge to tap into.   Acquisition Aesthetics offer a number of comprehensive training courses, comprising of robust theoretical study and hands-on injecting practice on live models. If you’re interested in joining the scores of happy graduates who pass through our academy then call our friendly team on 02035248757 or email contact@acquisitionaesthetics.co.uk.
Read More

How to Develop an Aesthetic Practice as a Nurse

  As an exciting and rapidly advancing industry, the aesthetics arena entices practitioners from a variety of professional backgrounds. Many hail from medicine as trained nurses, which makes sense, as medical nurses are perfectly placed to excel in the aesthetics field with their clinical training, understanding of anatomy and physiology, and experience managing patient care and safety. But how can you go about developing an aesthetic practice as a nurse? When looking into the initial steps of this journey, apprehension is understandably common. For many people working in medicine, the path from degree onwards is somewhat of a conveyor belt - considering anything outside of the status quo can feel daunting. But rest assured, you’re in good company. Scores of nurses have shared similar aspirations and have gone on to achieve great success and wonderful fulfilment. However, as with any new venture, there is much to consider when developing an aesthetic practice from a background as a medical nurse.   Training   Your aesthetics training will be the foundation upon which you build your success. Therefore, it is essential you choose a reputable academy with a proven track record, who can evidence consistently positive reviews from previous graduates. Botox® training for nurses is a popular offering, but not all training is created equal - do your research and ensure that you are confident with what you will be getting before parting with your money. Make sure the course provides hands-on injecting on live models (not only mannequins) in addition to comprehensive theoretical learning and be wary of academies that don’t state enrolment criteria for their delegates and take delegates from backgrounds that potentially wouldn’t be approved in the UKs aesthetics industry. Ideally, you’ll be in a learning environment with your peers: like-minded nurses and medical professionals looking to move into aesthetics.   Nitty gritty   There are going to be many lists in your life during this period of planning! There’s a lot to think about and a number of crucial things to get in place so that you can operate safely and ethically. You will need to decide if you want to set up your own clinic space or operate from an existing one and consider how this might affect how you order and store products and consumables. A number of practical obligations must also be fulfilled before you can accept your first patient, such as acquiring insurance, creating consent and medical history forms, and investing in a system for the secure storage of patient data in line with GDPR. It can seem overwhelming, especially if this is your first time launching a business, so seek sound advice from reliable sources. Look up the available guidance for becoming self-employed, research the ins and outs of entrepreneurialism and reach out to those who have already made it happen. Attend business seminars, start-up exhibitions and any aesthetic industry events you can find. This will not only help bolster your confidence and cement your next steps, but also grant you access to vital networking opportunities.   Stay ahead of the game   Whilst undertaking your foundation training is the first step, you are likely to want to diversify and enhance your portfolio in line with consumer trends and thus stay ahead of your competition. Consider any areas of particular interest and pay attention to what your prospective audience are asking for. This will guide you in choosing your further training, whether that’s an Advanced aesthetics course covering more complex treatments, or a bespoke course for a specific technique or treatment area, such as the ever popular Lip Augmentation. Botox® and filler training for nurses at every level should continue to meet the basic requirements of practical and theoretical learning, and a good academy should offer post-study support and mentoring as you commence practice. These courses often also carry CPD certification and therefore contribute towards your annual requirements.   A note on prescribing: Botulinum Toxin and Hyaluronidase (the reversing agent for complications with fillers) are both Prescription Only Medicine’s (POM’s) – meaning you need to be a licensed prescriber to obtain them. However, note- you do not have to be a licensed prescriber to administer them. If you are not a nurse prescriber you will need to link up with a prescriber who is prepared to review and prescribe for each of your patients, or, work within a clinic with an established group of affiliated prescribers, who coordinate clinical oversight for any POM’s. Alternatively, you can consider undertaking your V200 or V300 prescribing license, offered across the UK. You’ll need to meet the criteria in order to be accepted on the course, and this varies from University to University so again, research is key.   Know your worth   As a qualified nurse, you can offer aesthetic treatments to patients with greater clinical experience and enhanced safety. From considerable practice using needles to acute knowledge of the importance of a clean and sterile clinical setting, your patients will be in good hands. Use this to your advantage! Highlight the elements that make your offering unique when drawing up your marketing and outreach strategy, as well as when considering your placement within the industry. This will give you the edge in a market that is otherwise fairly saturated, but always has room for those who stand head and shoulders above the rest.   If you are ready to initiate your journey and develop and aesthetic practice as a nurse, look no further than Acquisition Aesthetics. We offer Foundation and Advanced training, specifically for medical professionals, alongside a number of bespoke Masterclasses to hone your skills and perfect your techniques. We are proud to provide comprehensive training under the guidance of our expert, surgical-led faculty of trainers; many of whom have successful clinics of their own. Our courses include industry insights and support on launching your business, as well as links to reputable suppliers and other industry professionals. Our graduates receive life-long mentoring and access to our exclusive Graduates Group – a great place to crowd source support from your peers and trainers in the aesthetics arena.   For more information on how to develop an aesthetic practice as a nurse, or to book your course, email contact@acquisitionaesthetics.co.uk or call 020 3514 8757 to speak to a member of the team today.
Read More

Medicine + more - pursuing passions beyond traditional medical practice

Undertaking medicine and related study in the healthcare field is not for the faint-hearted. Many doctors, dentists, and nurses have dreamed of their career since childhood and are dedicated to their practice. As high achieving and hardworking individuals by nature, more and more medical professionals are pursuing passions beyond traditional medical practice, or indeed alongside these professions.   Case in point Often, these interests and additional undertakings are related and complementary, as is the case with our very own Acquisition Aesthetics directors, and these practitioners continue to practice medicine either within the NHS or privately, whilst exploring their venture. Speaking on the conception of the thriving academy launched with co-founder Dr. Priyanka Chadha, Dr. Lara Watson says: “The rationale for setting up Acquisition Aesthetics was very simple – not only is the cosmetic industry poorly regulated; which is unsafe for both patients and practitioners but in fact, the training is poorly regulated and can be poorly delivered.”   Find support There are a number of NHS mentorship and support schemes available to medical professionals, from NHS Innovation - which invites healthcare pioneers from around the world to apply to develop and scale their tried and tested innovations across parts of the service, to NHS leadership - which supports individuals, organisations, and local partners to develop leaders; celebrating and sharing where outstanding leadership makes a real difference. Another available program is NHS Entrepreneurs, which offers clinical NHS staff and wider health professionals opportunities to develop their entrepreneurial aspirations during their clinical training period. Professional mentorship, colleague support, and peer encouragement are all essential for bolstering the confidence and resources of any medical professional aspiring to success either within or outside the remit of their core practice.   Branching out Interests can take more contrasting forms too and can give practitioners an additional avenue to explore their inherent drive, dedication, and aptitude for learning. Dr. Will, a plastic surgery trainee, is a great example of a respected medical professional who has taken his passion for health and wellbeing and combined this with his medical expertise to create Dr. Will’s Sauces - a fresh and exciting brand, providing health-conscious sauces. Others have found inspiration to support both the NHS and the struggling economy during the current pandemic. London doctor, Jack Manley collaborated with creative technology agency Rehab to build and launch a fundraising platform DeliverAid, which enables people to donate meals provided by local food businesses to frontline NHS workers.   Are you losing your spark? Whilst some professionals are already exploring how else they could be using their time and skills, many more are perhaps unaware of the scope and possibility of branching out into other areas, or have the idea but don’t feel encouraged to pursue it. Burn out is real, and sadly disenchantment within medicine is rife. It has even been reported that high numbers of doctors are considering leaving the profession once the threat of COVID is behind us. Speaking to The Independent, the BMA council chair Dr. Chaand Nagpaul said ‘We have been doing surveys throughout the pandemic, and over 30 percent of doctors are reporting mental health conditions such as anxiety, burnout, and depression at greater levels than before the pandemic.’   What’s the answer? Current crisis aside, the nurturing and mentorship of our medical professionals is essential to enable them to reignite their passion and find success, joy, and fulfilment within their core practice, but also to feel encouraged to embrace diverse opportunities and explore additional revenue streams outside of traditional medicine. There is a wellspring of rich and varied talent amongst medical professionals. Whilst it can seem daunting, many any are choosing to explore their creative and/or entrepreneurial sides through independent ventures and projects. Recent years have seen a paradigm shift towards the 'portfolio career', which is much more representative of the breadth of interest, initiative, and skill that exists within individuals. In addition, this helps engender greater contentment and increased agency over income and the ever-elusive work/life balance, and also creates a more sustainable economic structure as we find ourselves working for more years than ever before.   Keys to success Dr. Priya Chadha offers words of encouragement to any doctor or medical professional considering embarking on an enterprise utilising their unique professional skillset, in aesthetics or otherwise – “Pursue your passion. It may seem obvious, but if you’re passionate about something, I assure you, with hard work and dedication, you’ll succeed at it. It shouldn’t feel like a chore. When you really enjoy something it doesn’t feel like work- that’s the key and dream for everyone! It doesn’t have to be a fantasy- give it your best shot, surround yourself with supportive positive people, and find a fantastic mentor.’   Considering aesthetics? In recent years, many medical professionals have chosen to enter the exciting realm of facial aesthetics. With their clinical training and experience in patient care; doctors, dentists, and nurses are an obvious and safe choice for those seeking cosmetic injectable treatments. Scores of NHS and private practitioners are pursuing passions beyond traditional medical practice and discovering this with training for aesthetics medicine; complementing their existing clinical repertoire, and exponentially increasing their earning potential. If you’re interested in knowing how to become a cosmetic nurse , reach out to our friendly team to find the perfect aesthetics course for you. Email contact@acquisitionaesthetics.co.uk or call us on 020 3514 8757 to secure your place today.      
Read More

Non-surgical cosmetic treatments – the wait is almost over!

The COVID-19 pandemic has seen countries over the world in lockdown, including the UK. Whilst this has meant many of us have been unable to work, see loved ones, or undertake any of the other day to day activities we are used to – scores of people have also missed being able to attend their favoured aestheticians and clinics for non-surgical cosmetic treatments. With the lockdown measures now easing, and the industry tentatively opening its doors next month – the wait is almost over!   More Than Just A Pretty Face. For many people, undertaking non-surgical cosmetic procedures is about more than just looking good. Patients incorporate treatments into their self-care routines and praise the subsequent results as a vital component of maintaining their overall health and wellbeing. It has been reported that the inability to receive their usual treatments has been negatively impacting the self-esteem and overall mood of many, and our lines have been busy with many of our patients itching to get themselves booked in.   Will Lip Fillers Reign Supreme? Many patients have therefore joyfully received the news that most clinics will begin safely resuming practice in the UK in July.  A recent article in Harper’s Bazaar discussed whether lip filler treatments will decline in popularity in what is likely to be an extended period of mask-wearing. We have found that high numbers are looking to book the long-reigning popular treatments; including lip fillers, and sculpting treatments for the jaw and cheeks; alongside Botox treatments for the upper face and eye area. Most patients book these treatments for themselves, and the desire to achieve their perfect pout remains – mask or not.   Can I Get Multiple Treatments At Once? As countless patients used to regular treatment may have gone some time since their last appointment, many have concerns about getting all their usual treatments done at once. Patients will be pleased to know they are able to safely and effectively have a host of areas treated at the same appointment, and this is often the way to achieve a beautifully balanced overall result. A suitably trained aesthetician will be able to guide you in choosing the best combination of treatments that complement each other and produce the bespoke outcome you desire. Even if you are someone who previously had non-surgical cosmetic treatments regularly, it is important you are still given a thorough consultation ahead of treatment to ascertain the results you are looking for and ensure the suitability of the treatments. Of course, in light of COVID-19, there are new and important risks to consider when booking aesthetic treatments, and the clinic you attend should ensure you are fully versed on these risks allowing you to make an informed decision on your treatment options.   What If I Want Non-Surgical Cosmetics AND Medical-Grade Skincare Treatments? As discussed in another of our recent articles, medical-grade skincare is a vital component of receiving an all-encompassing treatment plan from your clinician. Aestheticians can prescribe them for their powerful anti-aging effects, and incorporating them into your daily routine can actually enhance the result of the injectables. If you have dermal filler or Botox treatment, you will generally need to wait a minimum of seven days before having a chemical peel, microdermabrasion treatment, or similar. Your expert clinician will be able to guide you on your options and outline the optimal treatment schedule for your desired results.   Stay Safe – Wait For A Professional Although we understand waiting months for your usual non-surgical cosmetic treatments is difficult, patients should be wary of aestheticians or clinics offering home visits during the lockdown – this is currently a direct breach of the government mandate and poses a significant safety concern for everyone involved. Not only does this increase the likelihood of furthering the spread of COVID-19, but a home environment is also unlikely to be suitable for the safe and sanitary provision of treatments. This increases the risk of complications, resulting in undesirable and/or dangerous outcomes for you as a patient, and potentially creates undue pressure on the NHS if you need to be treated by a medical professional. Those active in the industry have also done their utmost to keep in touch with their clients and keep them informed of the dangers of attempting DIY versions of their favourite procedures. These treatments should only be undertaken by a trained and insured professional and the risks of attaining these products and treatments by alternative means are high – including the risk of misdirected product entering the arteries, infection, and even irreversible blindness. As hard as the wait has been, make sure you book to be treated by a known and reputable clinician with the appropriate professional training and treatment space.   Book Your Treatment Now Our books are already filling up with cosmetic model appointments for our post-lockdown botox training courses. Booking as a cosmetic model with Acquisition Aesthetics provides you with access to bespoke treatments, closely supervised by our expert team of surgeons, all at cost price. You will also be pleased to know that we have put new safety protocols and policies in place in order to protect all our customers and ensure compliance with the latest government and clinical guidelines. If you would like to book a treatment on one of our dermal filler and botox training courses, call 020 3514 8757 or email models@acquisitionaesthetics.co.uk to secure your space with our friendly team.  
Read More

The Level 7 Certificate transitions to a new awarding organisation – what you need to know

As many of you will be aware, the Level 7 Diploma Certificate was the first officially regulated qualification for injectables in Aesthetic Medicine, and Acquisition Aesthetics awarded this certificate through an awarding organisation (AO) called Industry Qualifications. However, since the acquisition of Industry Qualifications by SFJ Awards – the certificate has been withdrawn and is no longer accepting new registrants from June 2020.   So what does this mean for you if you are already on the qualification or if you want to enrol on the qualification? Well, firstly, rest assured no matter which camp you are in, Level 7 qualifications are still around and here to stay as the benchmark and gold standard in aesthetic training! Hoorah!   If you are already enrolled on the Level 7… If you registered with ourselves or another training provider for the Level 7 Postgraduate Diploma before the withdrawal notice, you can still complete and achieve this qualification, and you have plenty of time to do so with a generous deadline for completion of 31st May 2022. So essentially, no changes for you and you continue as planned.   For those who have not yet registered but want to complete the Level 7 Certificate, we would advise you contacting us for more information and to register your interest now. Acquisition Aesthetics as an academy is coordinating the transition to a new awarding organisation so we are actively welcoming new registrants who wish to start the training now. Our new awarding body has a bespoke pathway to recognise prior learning so any work completed under the old specification from our previous awarding body will be acknowledged and won’t have to be repeated. What’s more, we and the aesthetics community at large are seizing this opportunity to enhance the learner journey and elevate the delegate experience alongside our new awarding organisation.   As recently quoted in the Aesthetics Journal, our own Director Dr. Lara Watson commented, "The training providers offering the Level 7 Certificate in Injectables for Aesthetic Medicine have come together to execute the smooth transition to a new and improved awarding body. Training academies including Acquisition Aesthetics, SkinViva, Cosmetic Courses, and Derma Medical are excited about the positive impact this will have on the learner experience and the regulation of the aesthetics industry as a whole."   If you have any queries or concerns regarding your existing enrolment on the Level 7 Certificate with Acquisition Aesthetics, or if you would like to know more about undertaking this certificate with our academy, please reach out to our friendly team. Call 0203514 8757 or email level7@acquisitionaesthetics.co.uk.    
Read More

Medical-grade skincare Q&A: Dr Bibi answers your questions

If you are an aesthetician considering expanding your portfolio to encompass medical-grade skincare, you may have a few questions. Who better to ask than an expert skin aesthetician? Dr. Bibi Ghalaie is a highly skilled cosmetic doctor and is the Clinical Lead for our Advanced Skin Course, launching soon and available to book now. Created in collaboration with skincare industry giant Alumier, this ‘first of its kind’ course provides comprehensive training in medical-grade skincare and practical competencies of chemical peeling. With over 12 years of experience in Aesthetic Medicine, Dr. Bibi Ghalaie’s past surgical experience at several of London's top teaching hospitals and at Harvard Medical Schoolis reflected in her dexterity and artistic approach. Her postgraduate studies in Dermatology, completed with Distinction, have provided a sound clinical knowledge of the skin, whichshe uses to enhance her aesthetic practice and disseminate invaluable knowledge to her delegates. Ahead of the launch date of the course, we asked Dr Bibi for her expert answers to some of your most pressing skin questions: What are the essentials of a good skincare routine? “A good skincare routine must be tailored to the individual patient. What is best for one skin type will not be suitable for every skin type. The goal of any routine should be to optimise the complexion whilst targeting specific concerns. In doing so, there are certain core principles that should always feature and it is important to note that consistency is key. Being adept in medical-grade skincare will enable clinicians to prescribe a bespoke and focused skincare routine for any patient they encounter. CLEANSING: Using a cleanser is the most basic step and is essential for getting rid of impurities, environmental pollutants, dirt, and bacteria. Washing twice a day, morning and night, will help to avoid clogged pores, dullness, and acne. The right formula will cleanse without stripping essential healthy oils. The cleanser should be tailored to the patient’s skin, for example, acne-prone skin can benefit from a salicylic acid cleanser. A good universal cleanser is micellar water, which is soap-free and suitable for almost every skin type. ANTIOXIDANT SERUMS: An antioxidant serum should be applied after cleansing to target the oxidising radicals that lead to skin cell damage, pigment deposition, and ageing. Vitamin C serums are excellent at neutralising free radicals, fighting photodamage, and promoting collagen production; thereby improving skin elasticity and texture whilst brightening surface skin tone. The vitamin C agent that is used should be medical grade. MOISTURISING:  A daily moisturiser applied after washing is essential for minimising transepidermal water loss and maintaining the skin barrier. This will help to prevent dryness and irritation of the skin. SUNSCREENS: Using sunscreen is essential, even in winter and when indoors. Photodamage not only ages the skin by reducing skin elasticity and contributing to the formation of wrinkles, but it can cause hyperpigmentation and lentigos. Daily UV radiation protection with a good sunscreen of at least SPF 30 should be used religiously. A combination product containing a moisturiser and/or Vitamin C and sunscreen can minimise the need for numerous steps in the skincare regime and can increase compliance. RETINOIDS: Retinoids are the most potent anti-ageing ingredients in our armoury. Topical retinoic acid-containing products play a key role in treating and preventing fine lines and rhytides, pigmentation, acne, and photodamage. They improve skin texture and tone through exfoliation and oxidising harmful free radicals. They can increase the photosensitivity of skin so they are best applied at night and must be used with a concurrent daily SPF. CHEMICAL PEELS: These involve chemical exfoliation using topical natural acids such as lactic acid, alpha-hydroxy acids, and glycolic acids. Periodic chemical peels should feature in every patient’s skin routine. They will improve skin texture, stimulate collagen production, and aid in better absorption of active ingredients. All of this contributes to an overall healthy and radiant complexion. Alumier’s famous Glow Peel is a perfect example.”   What is the value of including skincare into aesthetic consultations and treatment plans? “When practicing Aesthetic Medicine it is important not to forget that an aesthetic client should be treated with the same care, precaution, and attention as any medical patient. As such, attention to skin disease and skin health is as important as delivering injectables. A dermatology history should always be taken and this will provide the perfect opportunity to identify any previous skin disease, existing skin concerns, and the patient’s daily skin routine. I often see patients who attend requesting lip fillers or non-surgical rhinoplasty, but seem to be ignoring their acne or pigmentation. Similarly, patients who attend for Botulinum toxin admit that they are sun worshippers or, even worse, that they use sunbeds. Ignoring these important issues is not only failing to provide optimal care for your patient but it is also a missed source of revenue. The skincare products that we can prescribe for our patients are an entirely different proposition to the over-the-counter creams and serums that are often ineffective and overpriced. Most patients are unaware of the difference and it is important to educate them in this regard. Medical-grade skincare is evidence based, potent and can produce significant results on skin quality and appearance. As doctors, we can use these products to address a host of concerns from flaky, dry skin to oily skin, to skin diseases like rosacea and melasma.  Moreover, we can also prescribe them for their powerful anti-aging effects. It is so easy to incorporate these products into the patient’s daily routine and by doing so, we can actually enhance the result of the injectables. Skincare consultations should be an option in every aesthetic Doctor’s treatment portfolio and being trained on one of the top international ranges, like Alumier, will help you to excel in the aesthetic field. Furthermore, such consultations can be conducted by video link which is a major advantage for both clinicians and patients, especially in these uncertain times.”   Where do I source higher training in medical-grade skincare and chemical peeling? “Medical-grade skincare ranges all have their own training programmes that will familiarise you with their products and treatment methods.  The Acquisition Aesthetics Advanced Skin Course is unique in that it has been created with a medical focus. It will not only teach you about the key components and their effects on the skin, but it will encourage you to assess skin care products in an evidence-based fashion, and show you how to integrate them into a medical treatment plan for your patients.” At £699 + VAT per delegate, this course has limited spaces and will launch on 5th September 2020 in Central London. Delegates receive an exclusive invitation to open an Alumier account at 50% of the standard fee. Book your space here, email contact@acquisitionaesthetics.co.uk or call 020 3514 8757 to speak to a friendly member of the Acquisition Aesthetics team.
Read More

Your post-COVID aesthetics business recovery plan

The aesthetics industry has been deeply affected by the Coronavirus pandemic and many practitioners have financial and practical concerns regarding their businesses and clinics. With the provisional roadmap to recovery recently shared by the UK government serving as a light at the end of the tunnel, now is a good time to think about your post-COVID business recovery plan and your ability to follow the new mandated Covid-19 Secure Guidelines.   Please note that this article only indicates the guidance available at this moment in time and should not be used as a reference tool for practice.   What’s the schedule? The recent governmental plan outlines a loose schedule of how the country can expect to recommence activity in a gradual and controlled way, with Step 2 outlining the return of selected year groups to schools and a phased reopening of non-essential retailers from the 1st June, if able to practice social distancing measures. Personal care businesses such as hairdressers and beauty salons, hospitality facilities, and leisure facilities are tentatively scheduled for reopen from 4th July. The Government will issue further guidance shortly on the approach that will be taken to phasing, including which businesses will be covered in each phase and the timeframes involved. Due to the inherent close proximity required for aestheticians undertaking patient treatment, aesthetics clinics will fall under this latter Step 3 opening schedule, and will not be permitted to practice until 4th July at the earliest. In order to facilitate the fastest possible re-opening of these types of higher-risk businesses and public places, the Government will carefully phase and pilot re-openings to test their ability to adopt the new ‘COVID-19 Secure guidelines’.   Stay safe Considerations for both patient and staff safety will need to be established by all clinics planning to recommence practice once authorised to do so, including diligent use of PPE, continued social distancing where possible, and a frequent and robust cleaning schedule for all surfaces, shared items, and high traffic areas. Clinical advice and support can be sought from groups including the British Association of Cosmetic Nurses (BACN) which has recently published new operational guidance in the post-COVID environment. As mandated by the government, public transport for travel to work should continue to be avoided wherever possible alongside the use of face coverings and continued compliance with updated social distancing guidelines. The mental wellbeing of yourself and your staff is also paramount and we urge you to be aware and understanding of any anxieties or concerns that may arise as a result of returning to work in these times.   What will it look like? Existing aestheticians should be under no illusions that practice will look like before. Your clinic or business may be somewhat different for some time as all industries tentatively rebuild themselves but this can be viewed as an opportunity to embrace a diversified approach to practice and a way to bolster the adaptability of your business. Indeed, many independent groups argue that the resulting changes to practice may have already been expected and COVID-19 has simply acted as an accelerator of change into this new future of working. Consider virtual consultations (if not doing so already) and a phased return to practice, as well as restricted hours. This will help to reduce risk, as well as give your business the opportunity to recover gradually without overwhelm threatening your adherence to safety measures. Guidance on how to undertake clinical practice can be sourced from a variety of groups including the Joint Council of Cosmetic Practitioners (JCCP), the BACN, regulatory bodies including the GMC and GDC as well as the World Health Organisation (WHO) which has released specific guidance on hygiene, PPE and cleaning measures. Specific considerations covered by these sources include: Regular health screening of all patients and staff The continued protection of certain patients and staff with underlying health issues Use and cleaning of uniform including footwear Sterilising of clinical spaces Installation of special ventilation systems in high risk (aerosol generating) environments such as dental treatment rooms Scheduling of patient bookings to protect social distancing policies Migration to online/virtual consultations including follow up reviews where possible Education of patients on new clinical measures and practices It is also important to consider the possibility of a second UK peak in the prevalence of COVID and the impact that may have. Whilst the government has told businesses to begin tentative preparations to recommence work, it would pay to remain aware that should this situation occur it is likely the lockdown will be reinstated.   Government support There are a number of governmental support packages available for businesses large and small; for both the employed and self-employed. These include:   VAT deferrals that provide a direct cash injection of over £30bn, Self- Assessment tax deferrals providing a cashflow benefit of £13bn and more than 64,000 tailored Time to Pay arrangements agreed with businesses and individuals; A business rates holiday worth £11bn to businesses; Direct cash grants worth £10,000 or £25,000 for small businesses in various sectors worth over £12bn in total; £1.25bn support for innovative firms; A rebate scheme to reimburse SMEs for part of their SSP costs worth up to £2bn for up to two million businesses; and A package of government-backed and guaranteed loans, which make available approximately £330bn of guarantees. More information can be found at gov.uk.   Market your relaunch You will need to think carefully about innovative but appropriate ways to market your relaunch to both existing and prospective patients. Social media is an excellent platform for sharing information and guidance, either about aesthetics in general or updates and advice relating to staying safe as we may make our way out of the pandemic. Many practitioners often find they don’t have enough time to dedicate to their social content, so now is the perfect opportunity to bolster this with useful and relevant content, such as informational series’ on different treatments and products or IGTV streams on topical issues, for example. The importance of webinars and digital, validated, educationally strong content cannot be underestimated, especially at a time when there is so much uncertainty.   Networking events and training opportunities There is an abundance of resources and learning tools available online that aestheticians can access. In this time of reduced physical practice, these can be used to keep yourself and staff informed on industry development and mitigate against the attrition of knowledge. It’s also a fantastic time to enhance and attain knowledge on any areas that are lacking or new to you, ahead of being able to undertake further practical training. There are also now a number of COVID-19 specific online certifications available to provide a means of virtual training in the use of cosmetic injectables. As we move more firmly into a post-COVID period, it would be useful for both existing and new practitioners to attend aesthetics specific networking events to bolster connections in the industry and share and acquire knowledge and discuss best practice with your peers. A subscription to the Aesthetics Journal or similar publication will ensure you are kept up to date with the industry schedule and any upcoming events.   Acquisition Aesthetics - online short courses Acquisition Aesthetics have created a provision of remote access aesthetic education and training content via a number of online short courses, including an Injectables Refresher Course, covering the sciences and practical application of botox and dermal fillers. These online courses are available to book exclusively via direct contact with our team. Please call 020 3514 8757 or email contact@acquisitionaesthetics.co.uk. Subscribe to our email updates and keep an eye on our social media channels for more information.   There is no doubt that whilst the peak of the pandemic is behind us, challenging times lay ahead for us all on both a personal and professional level. We urge you all to stay safe and take care of yourselves, your families and your staff as we ease our way out of this global crisis. We extend our immense gratitude to those amongst our aesthetics community who have put their practice on hold to join the heroic efforts on the NHS frontline. Professional and personal support can be found at the following resources: GOV.UK Mind Refuge Shelter NHS Samaritans Money Advice Service British College of Aesthetic Medicine
Read More

Advanced Skin Course launched in collaboration with AlumierMD

As we know, all dedicated aesthetic practitioners are continually looking to develop their skills and enhance the experience and results they can deliver to their patients. A popular, lucrative, and cohesive avenue for many is that of professional skincare treatments, which neatly complement cosmetic injectables and enable practitioners to provide patients with fuller and more holistic treatment programmes. Acquisition Aesthetics have partnered with skincare industry giant AlumierMD to create a one-of-a-kind Advanced Skin Course providing delegates with comprehensive training in medical-grade skincare and chemical peeling. What will I learn? This course is unrivalled in its provision, combining gold standard teaching methods in aesthetic medicine with scientifically proven skincare sciences. Delegates will receive training on how to incorporate medical-grade skincare into their treatment plans and learn how to perform the infamous AlumierMD Glow Peel, amongst other fantastic chemical peels. Factors such as age, ethnicity, and climate all contribute to a skin profile, alongside skin type and any skin conditions. Understanding the unique properties of every individual is key to providing patients with optimal outcomes and desired results. Delegates will learn the key constituents of medical-grade skincare and how to apply this knowledge in the consultation and treatment planning for aesthetic clients. With a fully comprehensive overview of the AlumierMD treatment portfolio, delegates will come away experts in the delivery of this product range. What is a chemical peel? A chemical peel treatment is the process of intentionally causing carefully targeted damage to the skin, at one of the three classified depths, using a specific combination of ingredients, at an optimised concentration and formulation pH. The procedure encourages new tissue formation, improving skin tone and texture and reducing the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles. Chemical peel treatments can also reduce pore size appearance, remedy uneven skin tone, and improve acne. Advanced aestheticians understand that the benefits achieved through cosmetic injectables (botulinum toxin and dermal fillers) are controlled and defined by the quality of the skin. In this way, the best treatment plans will often involve a series of chemical peels and/or the conditioning of the skin with medical grade skincare prior to treatment with injectables. This approach ensures the optimal canvas for injectables, allowing you to deliver only the very best results to your clients. Introducing Dr. Bibi The clinical lead for the course is Dr. Bibi Ghalaie, who qualified in 2005 with degrees in Medicine and Surgery from the prestigious Imperial College London. She also holds an Honours Degree in Management with Health Sciences from Imperial College Business School. With over 12 years of experience in Aesthetic Medicine, Dr Bibi is a highly skilled cosmetic doctor and is the Clinical Lead for our Advanced Skin Course. Her past surgical experience at several of London's top teaching hospitals and at Harvard Medical School, are reflected in her dexterity and artistic approach. Her postgraduate studies in Dermatology, completed with Distinction, have provided a sound clinical knowledge of the skin, which she uses to enhance her aesthetic practice. Currently she is completing a Master's degree in Aesthetic Medicine at the renowned Blizard Research Institute at Queen Mary University in London. Dr Bibi is the Medical Director of British Aesthetics, her own private cosmetic clinic on London’s Wimpole Street. Her treatment portfolio ranges from skincare and basic injectables to complex liquid facelifts. With a long-established passion for teaching, she was a clinical lecturer and trainer in Aesthetic Medicine, both at the Royal College of General Practitioners and at the Royal Society of Medicine, for six years. She has trained over 2000 doctors across the world in cosmetic medicine procedures. Her cosmetic work is complemented by her regular work as a doctor in Accident & Emergency and in Urgent Care at several London NHS Trust hospitals.  Become an AlumierMD Skin Care Professional With a full morning of didactic teaching by leaders of industry in skin sciences, delegates in attendance will have the opportunity to learn from the very best, and will receive an exclusive invitation to set up an AlumierMD account - accessing all the benefits of becoming a professional provider of this renowned product range. A generous delegate start pack will be provided, including training materials and AlumierMD samples. Ongoing support As with all courses provided by Acquisition Aesthetics, delegates will also receive a full post-course support package from our expert team of professionals, as well as access to discounts on further training opportunities. One of the most valuable ways to cement learning and commence practice post-training is by crowd-sourcing guidance from peers in the field, as well as network and seek support from industry experts. All delegates who complete the Acquisition Aesthetics Advanced Skin Course will be invited to join the exclusive Acquisition Aesthetics Graduate Group, a powerful hub of invaluable industry insight and collective knowledge. Book now Acquisition Aesthetics are driven by excellence (an ethos shared by AlumierMD) and are thrilled to provide this comprehensive course for delegates on their journey to becoming multifaceted practitioners, bridging the gap between aesthetics and medical-grade skincare. At £699 + VAT per delegate, this course has limited spaces and will launch on 5th September 2020 in Central London. Book your space here, email contact@acquisitionaesthetics.co.uk, or call 020 3514 8757 to speak to a friendly member of the Acquisition Aesthetics team.    
Read More

COVID 19 - What you need to know as an aesthetics practitioner

As the current global situation unfolds in relation to the Coronavirus pandemic, many business and clinic owners will be affected and you may be considering what you need to know as an aesthetics practitioner. Follow the guidance As a multi-disciplinary team of doctors, surgeons and other NHS workers, Acquisition Aesthetics have compiled the below information for our graduates, based on that which is offered by the NHS and the Department for Health. The advice and guidance from the UK Government and Public Health England is subject to frequent and fast-paced change as the situation evolves and a greater understanding of the virus is achieved. It is therefore important to stay up to date with the latest announcements. Assess the risk It’s essential that all practitioners err on the side of caution. You will need to personally assess the risk for your organisation or clinic, but should now be cancelling non-essential treatments for the next few months in order to protect the safety of your patients and staff. If you are continuing to provide urgent/emergency services, it may be wise to send communication out to your patients to reassure them that your practice is dedicated to the health, safety, and wellbeing of its patients and to inform them of the steps you are taking to mitigate the issue through your own practice. The Aesthetics Journal has posted a helpful example notice that you could use as a template.    Take precautions Paralleling the necessary cancellation of all elective aesthetics procedures, you are encouraged to offer leniency on any usual cancellation penalties for those patients pre-empting the policy and contacting to cancel or reschedule appointments themselves. Where patients are deemed to require urgent or emergency treatment relating to recent aesthetics procedures, proceed with extreme caution should they be experiencing the following symptoms (as outlined by the Centre for Disease Control): Fever / high temperature New cough Shortness of breath Similar caution is imperative if they have been in contact with anyone with symptoms or a confirmed diagnosis, or have been out of the country.   Sensible additional processes will be necessary during operational hours for emergency/urgent care, such as: -Ensuring unwell staff members do not attend work. -Practitioners wearing Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) for all treatments, a mask, and gloves. -Capped bookings per day to avoid patients converging/crossing over within the clinic and allowing time for additional cleaning measures between patients. -Extra vigilance with frequent thorough hand washing, and cleaning of all surfaces, door handles, and high traffic areas. -Provision of tissues and waste bins. Encouragement to engage in Catch it, Bin it, Kill it. -Provision of educational guidance for your team and any attending patients - the CDC offer a number of printable resources.   Seek support You may be wondering what kind of financial support (or other support) is available to businesses at this time and what might be available in the future. Public Health England has outlined a number of planned support measures for small businesses in light of the current crises. These include grant funding, business loan schemes, business rate holidays and SSP relief packages. More information can be found in the COVID 19 – Support for Small Businesses guidance.   Take care of yourself Remember, the above guidance applies to you, too. Whilst it can be a concerning time to think about the possibility of not being well or available to run or manage your business, your health and the health of those around you must come first. This includes your mental wellbeing in a time fraught with worries and fear of the unknown, so do what you can to find a moment of peace within each day. Pay extra attention if you identify as a member of the vulnerable or at-risk groups defined by the NHS, or if you experience any of the following emergency symptoms which require immediate medical attention: Difficulty breathing or shortness of breath Persistent pain or pressure in the chest New confusion or inability to rouse Bluish lips or face This list is not exhaustive. Consult your medical provider for any other severe or concerning symptoms. As a medical professional, you have the advantage of possessing an enhanced understanding of infection control and risk, and best practice for cross-contamination avoidance, which you can use to better protect yourself and others from catching and/or spreading Coronavirus, whilst carrying out any urgent/emergency treatment. This is a difficult and uncertain time for us all, but we are confident our country will follow others around the world and come out the other side of this pandemic in the months to come, ready to continue business as usual.
Read More

Starting your own aesthetics practice – 5 key pointers

If you’re thinking of starting your own aesthetics practice, then firstly give yourself a pat on the back for taking the leap into this exciting and rapidly growing industry! Your success will depend on more than just good fortune and we have put together a step by step guide to ensure you are adequately prepared for your new venture.   1. Build your foundations – get qualified To safely and competently provide non-surgical cosmetic procedures for your patients, you need to have achieved a sufficient level of training in the effective administration of treatments, most commonly those using Botulinum toxin and Dermal Fillers. If you are new to aesthetics, you will need to start with a Foundation course in Botox and Dermal Fillers, covering the basic theoretical principles and practical injecting techniques you will need to treat patients. Ensure your chosen academy is reputable, and offers you hands-on practical training on live models, delivered by an experienced and multi-faceted faculty. It is also useful to check if the academy offers any ongoing support or mentorship, for when you are newly practicing and may benefit from seeking advice. 2. Build your business Starting and running your own business may be unfamiliar territory, so in order to ensure you are operating legally and with safety in mind, there are a few key things to consider. In the UK, it is advised that you register as self-employed and gain appropriate insurance, sufficient for your needs and practice. There are a number of insurance providers, such as Hamilton Fraser, Cosmetic Insure, and Enhance Insurance, who offer cover specifically for the aesthetics industry. You will also need to organise your facilities and treatment space, whether that’s your own contained unit or a spot within an existing facility; and purchase all your equipment, supplies, and consumables. It is useful to conduct thorough research into the aesthetic products available on the market, though you should also gain an insight into this within any good foundation training via supplied industry insights and direct practice using the products. It is crucial to prepare a solid data infrastructure and management system for your business, enabling you to collate and store necessary patient data, whilst adhering to GDPR. You will also need a collection of documents to enable you to provide a safe service to each of your patients. These should include a comprehensive consenting protocol, consultation documents, treatment forms, and aftercare advice documents.  3. Brand awareness Now it’s time for people to learn you’re out there! Decide on your brand, your ethos, and your patient offering and start promoting yourself. When considering branding, think about the feel and atmosphere you want for your aesthetics space. Natural wood, with soft greys and lots of greenery for a natural, spa-like vibe, or perhaps a space with lots of natural light, plenty of white and lots of clean lines for a pure and clinical feel. Social proof is everything, and your potential patients are discerning members of a public that knows what they want and where to find it. Having a social media presence is a given, but ensuring you are informative, responsive and engaged on all your active platforms will help people to build trust. Ensure you also remain abreast of the CAP Code and ASA regulations surrounding advertisement and promotion of your aesthetic services. Equally, your standing with your peers is equally as important. Join relevant bodies such as the ACE group, attend networking events such as CCR Expo or ACE, lectures, and functions; and generally ensure you remain active in the industry. Get to know your competitors and learn what they’re doing well and where you perhaps have an edge. In time, you have the option to consider partnerships and other mutually beneficial working relationships, which often occur organically if you maintain a firm standing in your aesthetics community. If you do happen to have a specialism or particular area of expertise, then consider how this knowledge can benefit your community and seek opportunities to submit articles or research papers on your chosen subject to industry publications. Exposure in a publication such as the Aesthetics Journal is an excellent opportunity to further enhance your reach. In time you may find yourself placed as a thought leader in a chosen area and sought out for your knowledge and experience. 4. Consider your client base Word of mouth is everything, we all know this to be true. A happy client not only becomes a repeat client, but they tell their friends about you too! Your reputation is crucial to your continued success and there are a number of things you can do to ensure it remains positive, such as ensuring you allow ample time for a thorough consultation with every patient – they don’t want to feel hurried. You also have an ethical obligation to ensure the consent process has been suitably conducted, and that the patient understands the treatment they are undertaking and any possible complications or risks. Make an effort to build rapport, and always offer aftercare support and advice at each treatment. Once you have established a few clients, ask them for feedback! If they’re happy with their treatment – ask them to leave a review. You can also consider loyalty schemes for your regular patients to fortify your patient retention. 5. Develop your knowledge and keep learning Whilst a foundation understanding of aesthetic treatments will equip you to provide a solid number of procedures for your initial client base; in order to continue to expand your business and your offering to patients you will need to enhance your portfolio. Advanced training for aesthetics will give you a greater depth of understanding of a wider range of treatments, and there are also a number of specialist classes for specific skill areas, if you have a particular treatment or technique you wish to improve on. You can also consider embarking on the Level 7 Certificate in Injectables for Aesthetic Medicine, the qualification likely to soon be recognised from a legal and ethical perspective as the minimum accepted level of training for practitioners of aesthetics. Many available courses are CPD certified meaning they can count towards your evidence of continued professional development. When deciding which area to expand your knowledge in, consider asking your own patients. Not only is this free market research, but it also means if you take their comments on board, you can be somewhat confident of the uptake once you have completed the training. This can help to offset any training costs incurred. By adhering to the above key pointers when starting your own aesthetics practice, you will secure yourself a high potential of success – both fulfilling, and lucrative; whilst meeting the needs of your patients.          
Read More

New enforceable guidelines for Botox® advertising from CAP

As of 31st January 2020, new enforceable guidelines came into effect for the advertising of Prescription Only Medicines (POM’s) including Botulinum toxin. This followed a surprise announcement by the Committee of Advertising Practice (CAP) earlier in the month. Outlined – the MHRA, ASA, and CAP The Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Authority (MHRA) is a Government agency responsible for the licensing of medicines. They ensure that medicines and medical devices work, and are acceptably safe. They previously produced the ‘Blue Guide – Advertising and Promotion of Medicines in the UK’ in order to ensure medicines are not ‘treated as an ordinary general commodity’ due to the potential associated adverse effects. The work of the MHRA is supported by the UK Code of Non-Branded Advertising and Direct and Promotional Marketing (CAP Code), which outlines the advertising rules for marketing communications. These rules are then enforced by the Advertising Standards Authority (ASA), the UK’s independent advertising regulator. Prescription Only Medicines (POM’s) Botulinum toxin, commonly known under the brand names of Botox®, Azzalure®, and Bocouture®, is a Prescription Only Medicine (POM) and as per the aforementioned CAP Code and the Human Medicines Regulations 2012 - it is an offence to promote or incentivise its use to the public. Whilst this code of conduct has been in place for some time, the new enforceable nature of these guidelines utilises monitoring technology in order to effectively identify ads that are in breach of the regulations and report them to Instagram. It is also possible that the MHRA or relevant regulatory bodies could be informed of any breaches So what’s actually changed?  Aesthetic practitioners can no longer directly OR indirectly reference Botulinum Toxin: The official guidelines are as follows: Remove direct references to Botox® or other POMs, including references in images and use of hashtags e.g. #botox or #antiwrinkletreatment. References must also not be used in offers or sales packages. Do not substitute direct references to POM’s with indirect phrases that can only refer to a POM such as “wrinkle relaxing injections”. This is indirect promotion of a POM, and just as much of a problem. Be aware the ASA considers that a reference to “anti-wrinkle injections” alongside a price that relates to a POM will be seen as an ad for that POM (also see below re “anti-wrinkle injections” claims) Avoid references to treating medical conditions in a way that could indicate the promotion of a POM, for example “injections for excessive sweating” (hyperhidrosis). If you offer non-POM treatments, you could instead refer to “treatments for excessive sweating” or similar. The CAP guidelines confirm that what practitioners should instead do is focus on the consultation process offered, with the guidelines stating, “Promote the service you provide and the consultation itself. Claims such as ‘a consultation for the treatment of lines and wrinkles’ may be acceptable.” Social Responsibility Adherence to these new enforceable guidelines for Botox® advertising is not only wise from a regulatory standpoint, given the possible consequences of any breaches; but also in order for practitioners to conduct themselves in a way that takes responsibility for the safety and wellbeing of their potential audience. The public often emulate the appearance of those they see in the media. From everyday people sharing their treatment results to more overt celebrity endorsement – the impact on the rise in popularity of both surgical and non-surgical cosmetic procedures is clear. The boom of social media over the last few years, particularly Instagram as a visually focused platform, has, of course, contributed to the exponential acceleration of this market. Potential patients who were to view inappropriate promotion of POM’s are vulnerable to being misled in terms of the achievable results, as well as underestimating the risks involved in what is inherently a medical procedure. The provision of treatment using Botulinum toxin is a medical one requiring a prescription from a qualified healthcare professional after they've deemed it clinically indicated from a face to face consultation. Train with us As a responsible academy of aesthetic medicine, Acquisition Aesthetics urges all their graduates to act diligently and responsibly when using social platforms to attract new patients and ensure strict adherence to the guidelines. We have updated our course learning materials to highlight and reinforce the practical, ethical application of the CAP Code within the theoretical segment of all courses. If you’re interested in joining our botox training academy, you can view all our available courses here. If you’d like to discuss your training options further, email contact@acquisitionaesthetics.co.uk or call 0203 514 8757 to speak to a member of our friendly team.
Read More